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Enhance your purchase. Fifteen-year-old Aaron lives amongst the rubbish piles in the slums of Cairo. His job? To collect broken glass. His life? His hope? To find a future he can believe in. Today in Cairo, Egypt, there is a city within a city: a city filled with garbage–literally.

As one of the Zabbaleen people, Aaron makes his living sorting through waste. When his family kicks him out, his only alternatives are to steal, beg, or take the most nightmarish garbage-collecting job of all. Previous page. Print length. Albert Whitman Teen. Publication date. Grade level. Reading age. Lexile measure. See all details. Next page. Review “Perera takes teen readers into a new world in this often-eloquent novel A novel of hope and redemption in the most unlikely of settings.

Perera draws a vivid portrait of the community’s squalid living conditions A powerful rendering of human struggle, resilience, and hope. She worked as an English teacher in two secondary schools in London, and later became responsible for a unit for boys excluded from mainstream schools.

She lives in Hampshire, England. Her first young adult novel was Guantanamo Boy. Read more. Tell the Publisher! I’d like to read this book on Kindle Don’t have a Kindle? Explore together: Save with group virtual tours. Amazon Explore Browse now. Customer reviews. How customer reviews and ratings work Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them.

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Verified Purchase. Learning about other societies makes us culturally richer; this book accomplishes that and more. I will definitely recommend this to my literary friends. Last year I read Perera’s Guantanamo Boy and appreciated Perera’s skill in tackling such a prominent part of world politics when most YA shies away from that.

Thus I was excited to see another work from her, this time looking at the Zabbaleen people in Cairo, Egypt who collect the garbage of the city.

Thick and brilliant white. This book captures such a unique experience: a teenage Zabaleen garbage collector in Cairo. This perspective alone was enough to keep me going through a somewhat meandering plot. Good and interesting book. Also kind of sad. Bit of an unexpected gem, this! Anyone with teenage kids might want to encourage them to read this book about life and survival in truly awful conditions, and not a vampire in sight!!

Aaron is one of the Zabbaleen people of Egypt. The Zabbaleen are the unofficial trash collectors of Egypt. Each day, hundreds of children just like Aaron go out into the streets of Cairo and pick through the piles of garbage looking for recyclables. They haul it home, sort it, and sell it. Their lives are surrounded by garbage. When Aaron’s step family kicks him out, Aaron has few choices. He can steal, beg, die, or take the worst garbage collection job there is – a medical waster.

So, this was pr Aaron is one of the Zabbaleen people of Egypt. So, this was pretty horrific. I didn’t know. I didn’t know there were such people as the Zabbaleen, and that they’ve been there for a long time, and that they’re still there. It really makes me think about all the other terrible things that are going on in the world I don’t have any idea about. There are incredibly vivid descriptions of the squalor Aaron and other people in his village live in.

They live with trash, day in and day out. The sleep next to it, they eat next to it. There’s the constant horrible smell. Without them, trash would overrun Egypt. It’s incredibly dangerous.

As you would guess, disease runs rampant. The most dangerous of all the jobs is being a medical waster, and only the most poor and desperate take that job. These are the people who go through the trash at hospitals or other medical facilities. That means you have people picking through used needles and blood bags with their bare hands. Many of them die from infection. For me reading this was more learning about a people I didn’t even know was out there.

The story itself was secondary, and a little disjointed. Aaron’s job is collecting glass. He loves glasses, and there a perfume shop he’s obsessed with. He loves to look at the beauty of the glass bottles. One day, he goes so far as to steal some. When he’s caught, he’s shunned by his step family and now must figure out how to survive. He is in love with a girl names Rachel, and has to deal with his abusive stepfather and his very violent stepbrother.

Much like Okay for Now, the end wrapped up in a tidy way that didn’t fit with the rest of the story. Aaron’s stepbrother undergoes a dramatic character change that comes out of nowhere, and Rachel suddenly decides to marry him.

His stepfather dies and now he doesn’t have to be a medical waster any more. That was all a little strange. I don’t know if this is a book a kid would just pick up, and it’s not one I would recommend for a light read, but for those social justice conscious kids it’s a great one.

The Glass Collector will be available March 1, I don’t know if I am oversensitive or precious, but unless there is something redemptive to keep me reading through it all, I do not enjoy reading about or watching, for that matter misery, extreme poverty and abuse. Don’t get me wrong, I read a lot of books about India, and sad books that involve a lot of pain and suffering, but I must admit that most of those are written for adults, and it would be harder to write about these topics for a younger audience.

I Love the work of Rohinton Mistry I don’t know if I am oversensitive or precious, but unless there is something redemptive to keep me reading through it all, I do not enjoy reading about or watching, for that matter misery, extreme poverty and abuse. I Love the work of Rohinton Mistry and Gregory David Roberts, and Arundati Roy, and they all refuse to turn their own or the reader’s face from the misery that they depict.

But they are such wonderful writers that the depictions of joy within their worlds are gifts to the reader, and their characterisations so compassionate that we feel we cannot leave the people of that world, and so we stay to learn with them, and eventually be redeemed with them I do need that promise of hope somewhere, I think.

So why am I writing about all these other books when I am supposed to be talking about The Glass Collector? Because the contrast is stark between the above group of works and this one. Perera seems to lack the skill to sufficiently draw the reader into this world to make them stay for the journey, and it takes an extraordinary skill to draw us into these places which are unpleasant and stinking and abusive and just sad. I almost think that adolescents are a group that even more dearly need the promise of hope as a shadow beneath their feet as they read a novel such as this one.

And there is a promise of hope, on the blurb of the book, but it takes up until the last 50 or so pages of the novel until this hope emerges from the trash and misery to become real. Whilst we hope for the best for our hero, Aaron, he isn’t sufficiently optimistic, unique, inspired, humorous, intelligent or quirky to make us dream with him, and he is downtrodden by the shabbiness of his world into a depression which we can certainly relate to, but never enjoy, like the great writers can encourage us to do.

Interestingly, to go on again about a different book, I’ve just started my next read, which is tragic and upsetting – The Fault in our Stars, by John Green, and its nothing like this. I already love the character who is to die by the end of the book, and am fully invested in the depressing world of her decline into death from cancer.

Perera gets plenty of brownie points for tackling a challenging subject, and possibly introducing it to our YA readers, but I’m not sure they will stick with it for the whole journey, which is sad. Last year I read Perera’s Guantanamo Boy and appreciated Perera’s skill in tackling such a prominent part of world politics when most YA shies away from that.

Thus I was excited to see another work from her, this time looking at the Zabbaleen people in Cairo, Egypt who collect the garbage of the city. This is another timely topic as the book is set just before the Egyptian uprising of last year, overthrowing Hosni Mubarak. I’m not very familiar with Egypt so most everything that was discussed was Last year I read Perera’s Guantanamo Boy and appreciated Perera’s skill in tackling such a prominent part of world politics when most YA shies away from that.

I’m not very familiar with Egypt so most everything that was discussed was brand-new to me. I did not know that the Zabbaleen were a community within Egypt to collect the discarded trash, sorting and recycling what is still usable far beyond the work of Western waste-collecting companies. They are also Coptic Christians in a predominantly Muslim country and incredibly poor, especially in comparison to the wealthy tourists who visit the city.

Another important part of their economy is maintaining pigs, a casualty of swine flu fears, which majorly impacted them. All of these strands are present in the story but not as much as I would have liked. Actually I think I would have enjoyed a non-fiction examination of the Zabbaleen written by someone with the skill of Perera because I loved these themes and would like to be more informed about them.

However there is also a story featuring main character Aaron, the titular glass collector who is drawn to the beauty of the glass. I don’t know, I just could not connect with this guy. He dreams of a better world, away from his cruel stepbrother and stepfather and starting a romantic relationship with the girl who tends the horses.

But he also steals from a shop-owner, lies, and runs away. I generally felt sympathetic toward him as his situation is awful but I was wondering how the story would go. He was not enough to capture my attention nor did the other characters spark for me. Sometimes there were pages where nothing was really happening and the story just stalled. I did not get the feeling that there was an ending that the story was driving to; it was just meandering.

This book had some serious potential that it didn’t quite live up to. I read it via an ARC from netgalley, so perhaps there will have been a touch more editing before the book is published? In short, the book centers around a teenager named Aaron who is part of the Zabbaleen people who are Coptic Christians outside the city of Cai This book had some serious potential that it didn’t quite live up to.

In short, the book centers around a teenager named Aaron who is part of the Zabbaleen people who are Coptic Christians outside the city of Cairo. Only they aren’t like our Western garbage men.

They pick the trash up with their bare hands, cart it back home, sort it into various piles, live with it in their homes for up to two weeks, and finally sell it a merchant on his biweekly trek to their area. The descriptions of the filth in their lives, of the hardships present all around them, and of their poverty are heart-breaking. Aaron is a beauty-loving expert at collecting bits of sparkling, colorful glass without hurting himself, but gives into temptation and steals some.

That is a serious offense in his community, and he is ousted from his stepfamily. Through the rest of the book, he manages to survive–even collecting medical waste at one point–until, suddenly, things resolve at the end of the book Strong social consciousness elements, strong environmental issues, pointed remarks about the wastefulness of the wealthy, and Aaron’s interesting realization that even he–a poor Zabbaleen–has an important role to play in society make this a book for discussion.

But the point of view wavered, the ending was too neat, and the plot rambled a bit–making this a book most kids won’t suffer through voluntarily unless they’re interested in the concepts presented. View 2 comments. This book takes readers into the real life trash cities located in Cairo. A fifteen year old boy named Aaron has a job as a Zabbaleen, or trash collector in Arabic. Every day he leaves his smelly home to go and comb the alley ways of Cairo for pieces of precious glass that can be recycled.

The family of four just scrapes by, but when their source of transportation is destroyed life becomes practically unbearable. Being the youngest and most expendable, after Aaron is accused of stealing he is cast out of his house. He must find a way to survive with nothing but his dreams and love. I thought this book did a great job of making the reality of poverty very understandable.

Anna Perera did a wonderful job with vivid imagery and I really thought that I was sifting through trash looking for my next meal. I love the way Aaron was characterized. Perera did a wonderful job with making his crises so real. He is a hard, unloving boy on the outside, yet so soft and loving on the inside. The Glass Collector was very engaging and had me continue reading after each chapter.

In almost every chapter an event occurred that was critical to the story line. It was not predictable either. I was expecting a very different ending, but was pleasantly surprised because the way Perera wrote it was much more realistic and eye opening.

I would recommend this book for anyone who is looking to explore poverty issues or would just like a good read.

Every time I read a book about some previously unknown atrocity occurring in a developing country, part of my heart shrivels up and blackens a bit more than it already is, causing me to think that the earth is, in fact, on a ruinous path of destruction as predicted by our friends, the Mayans.

I’m not sure why I do this to myself. And, on that happy note, comes the topic of this book, about a class of people, Coptic Christians living in Cairo called Zabaleen Arabic for garbage collectors.

They p Every time I read a book about some previously unknown atrocity occurring in a developing country, part of my heart shrivels up and blackens a bit more than it already is, causing me to think that the earth is, in fact, on a ruinous path of destruction as predicted by our friends, the Mayans.

They pick through garbage for a living, separating recyclables and selling it for profit, but without the benefit of gloves or sanitary facilities. As you can imagine, this type of work is extremely hazardous and unsanitary, particularly for the “medical wasters,” people who grab bags of used syringes, tubing and bandages and dig through it with their bare hands to find recyclable items.

Just the thought of this reduces me to shivers and gags. Anyway, the book follows a boy who lives in a shantytown full of garbage; his specialty is collecting glass, as the title suggests. He resides with his stepfamily who treat him like Cinderella. Although the plot wasn’t incredibly cohesive, I think the purpose of the novel was really to illustrate to adolescents residing in the Western World that their lives are really privileged, comparatively speaking. So, next time you complain about homework, annoying parents or pesky siblings, remember Which I definitely think is an important lesson for kids to grasp, even if they roll their eyes and pretend not to care.

Friendships and family are important, more so sometimes than your standing in life. This is obviously what Aaron believes. Born a Zabbaleen, Aaron is forced to work with the rest of the men to scavenge rubbish off the busy streets of Cairo. Living with his abusive stepfamily and with the low price of recyclable goods scraping a living is much harder than it once was.

Aaron did always have a special way with the glass; only his practiced fingers could gather so much broken glass without cutting h Friendships and family are important, more so sometimes than your standing in life. Keyword Title Author Topic. Perera, Anna: The Glass Collector. Perera, Anna: The Glass Collector.. Next Article: Ransom, S. Topics: Books. Reading Time. Ransom, S.

 
 

Glass Book Reviews

 

Perera has written this novel after her visit to Egypt to see for herself first hand the Zabaleen, the people who are responsible for dealing with most of the waste in Cairo. These families live, eat and sleep in the mountains продолжить чтение rubbish they collect and sort, to be sold to merchants. A situation briefly glass collector book review free in the Author’s note.

Out of her visit came this heartening story of Aaron, a fictional character created by Perara as is the story that grows around him.

However, the lifestyle is based on fact, making the novel both interesting and informative. Given the horrendous conditions these people live in, Perera has written the story with beauty and hope through the glass collector book review free Aaron experiences both in his passion for glass and perfumes and the love of a girl. It is a story that explores the darkest moments of a life this boy has to endure with his step-family to the beauty he finds in life around him.

It ссылка the depth of human endurance and pride that is found in a job well done and worth doing. An amazing glass collector book review free written with an uplifting spirit bok in the depths of what we perceive as suffering. It has the ability to make vollector reader question the different values held by other colelctor.

Highly recommended. Feedback For webmasters. Periodicals Literature. Keyword Title Author Topic. Perera, Anna: The Glass Collector. Perera, Anna: The Glass Collector. Next Article: Ransom, S. Topics: Books. Reading Time. Ransom, S. Books Book reviews.

 

Book Reviews for The Glass Collector By Anna Perera | Toppsta.

 

I don’t know if I am oversensitive or precious, but unless there is something redemptive to keep me reading through it all, I do not enjoy reading about or watching, for that matter misery, extreme poverty and abuse. Don’t get me wrong, I read a lot of books about India, and sad books that involve a lot of pain and suffering, but I must admit that most of those are written for adults, and it would be harder to write about these topics for a younger audience.

I Love the work of Rohinton Mistry I don’t know if I am oversensitive or precious, but unless there is something redemptive to keep me reading through it all, I do not enjoy reading about or watching, for that matter misery, extreme poverty and abuse. I Love the work of Rohinton Mistry and Gregory David Roberts, and Arundati Roy, and they all refuse to turn their own or the reader’s face from the misery that they depict.

But they are such wonderful writers that the depictions of joy within their worlds are gifts to the reader, and their characterisations so compassionate that we feel we cannot leave the people of that world, and so we stay to learn with them, and eventually be redeemed with them I do need that promise of hope somewhere, I think.

So why am I writing about all these other books when I am supposed to be talking about The Glass Collector? Because the contrast is stark between the above group of works and this one. Perera seems to lack the skill to sufficiently draw the reader into this world to make them stay for the journey, and it takes an extraordinary skill to draw us into these places which are unpleasant and stinking and abusive and just sad.

I almost think that adolescents are a group that even more dearly need the promise of hope as a shadow beneath their feet as they read a novel such as this one. And there is a promise of hope, on the blurb of the book, but it takes up until the last 50 or so pages of the novel until this hope emerges from the trash and misery to become real. Whilst we hope for the best for our hero, Aaron, he isn’t sufficiently optimistic, unique, inspired, humorous, intelligent or quirky to make us dream with him, and he is downtrodden by the shabbiness of his world into a depression which we can certainly relate to, but never enjoy, like the great writers can encourage us to do.

Interestingly, to go on again about a different book, I’ve just started my next read, which is tragic and upsetting – The Fault in our Stars, by John Green, and its nothing like this.

I already love the character who is to die by the end of the book, and am fully invested in the depressing world of her decline into death from cancer. Perera gets plenty of brownie points for tackling a challenging subject, and possibly introducing it to our YA readers, but I’m not sure they will stick with it for the whole journey, which is sad.

Last year I read Perera’s Guantanamo Boy and appreciated Perera’s skill in tackling such a prominent part of world politics when most YA shies away from that. Thus I was excited to see another work from her, this time looking at the Zabbaleen people in Cairo, Egypt who collect the garbage of the city. This is another timely topic as the book is set just before the Egyptian uprising of last year, overthrowing Hosni Mubarak. I’m not very familiar with Egypt so most everything that was discussed was Last year I read Perera’s Guantanamo Boy and appreciated Perera’s skill in tackling such a prominent part of world politics when most YA shies away from that.

I’m not very familiar with Egypt so most everything that was discussed was brand-new to me. I did not know that the Zabbaleen were a community within Egypt to collect the discarded trash, sorting and recycling what is still usable far beyond the work of Western waste-collecting companies.

They are also Coptic Christians in a predominantly Muslim country and incredibly poor, especially in comparison to the wealthy tourists who visit the city. Another important part of their economy is maintaining pigs, a casualty of swine flu fears, which majorly impacted them.

All of these strands are present in the story but not as much as I would have liked. Actually I think I would have enjoyed a non-fiction examination of the Zabbaleen written by someone with the skill of Perera because I loved these themes and would like to be more informed about them.

However there is also a story featuring main character Aaron, the titular glass collector who is drawn to the beauty of the glass. I don’t know, I just could not connect with this guy. He dreams of a better world, away from his cruel stepbrother and stepfather and starting a romantic relationship with the girl who tends the horses. But he also steals from a shop-owner, lies, and runs away. I generally felt sympathetic toward him as his situation is awful but I was wondering how the story would go.

He was not enough to capture my attention nor did the other characters spark for me. Sometimes there were pages where nothing was really happening and the story just stalled. I did not get the feeling that there was an ending that the story was driving to; it was just meandering. Feb 21, Betsy rated it liked it Shelves: young-adult , arc , e-books. This book had some serious potential that it didn’t quite live up to.

I read it via an ARC from netgalley, so perhaps there will have been a touch more editing before the book is published? In short, the book centers around a teenager named Aaron who is part of the Zabbaleen people who are Coptic Christians outside the city of Cai This book had some serious potential that it didn’t quite live up to.

In short, the book centers around a teenager named Aaron who is part of the Zabbaleen people who are Coptic Christians outside the city of Cairo. Only they aren’t like our Western garbage men. They pick the trash up with their bare hands, cart it back home, sort it into various piles, live with it in their homes for up to two weeks, and finally sell it a merchant on his biweekly trek to their area.

The descriptions of the filth in their lives, of the hardships present all around them, and of their poverty are heart-breaking. Aaron is a beauty-loving expert at collecting bits of sparkling, colorful glass without hurting himself, but gives into temptation and steals some.

That is a serious offense in his community, and he is ousted from his stepfamily. Through the rest of the book, he manages to survive–even collecting medical waste at one point–until, suddenly, things resolve at the end of the book Strong social consciousness elements, strong environmental issues, pointed remarks about the wastefulness of the wealthy, and Aaron’s interesting realization that even he–a poor Zabbaleen–has an important role to play in society make this a book for discussion.

But the point of view wavered, the ending was too neat, and the plot rambled a bit–making this a book most kids won’t suffer through voluntarily unless they’re interested in the concepts presented. View 2 comments. Jan 23, Flint Lockwood rated it liked it. This book takes readers into the real life trash cities located in Cairo.

A fifteen year old boy named Aaron has a job as a Zabbaleen, or trash collector in Arabic. Every day he leaves his smelly home to go and comb the alley ways of Cairo for pieces of precious glass that can be recycled. The family of four just scrapes by, but when their source of transportation is destroyed life becomes practically unbearable.

Being the youngest and most expendable, after Aaron is accused of stealing he is cast out of his house. He must find a way to survive with nothing but his dreams and love. I thought this book did a great job of making the reality of poverty very understandable.

Anna Perera did a wonderful job with vivid imagery and I really thought that I was sifting through trash looking for my next meal. I love the way Aaron was characterized. Perera did a wonderful job with making his crises so real. He is a hard, unloving boy on the outside, yet so soft and loving on the inside. The Glass Collector was very engaging and had me continue reading after each chapter. In almost every chapter an event occurred that was critical to the story line.

It was not predictable either. I was expecting a very different ending, but was pleasantly surprised because the way Perera wrote it was much more realistic and eye opening.

I would recommend this book for anyone who is looking to explore poverty issues or would just like a good read. Every time I read a book about some previously unknown atrocity occurring in a developing country, part of my heart shrivels up and blackens a bit more than it already is, causing me to think that the earth is, in fact, on a ruinous path of destruction as predicted by our friends, the Mayans.

I’m not sure why I do this to myself. And, on that happy note, comes the topic of this book, about a class of people, Coptic Christians living in Cairo called Zabaleen Arabic for garbage collectors. They p Every time I read a book about some previously unknown atrocity occurring in a developing country, part of my heart shrivels up and blackens a bit more than it already is, causing me to think that the earth is, in fact, on a ruinous path of destruction as predicted by our friends, the Mayans.

They pick through garbage for a living, separating recyclables and selling it for profit, but without the benefit of gloves or sanitary facilities.

As you can imagine, this type of work is extremely hazardous and unsanitary, particularly for the “medical wasters,” people who grab bags of used syringes, tubing and bandages and dig through it with their bare hands to find recyclable items. Just the thought of this reduces me to shivers and gags. Anyway, the book follows a boy who lives in a shantytown full of garbage; his specialty is collecting glass, as the title suggests.

He resides with his stepfamily who treat him like Cinderella. Although the plot wasn’t incredibly cohesive, I think the purpose of the novel was really to illustrate to adolescents residing in the Western World that their lives are really privileged, comparatively speaking. So, next time you complain about homework, annoying parents or pesky siblings, remember Which I definitely think is an important lesson for kids to grasp, even if they roll their eyes and pretend not to care.

Sep 24, Kayla rated it it was ok. Friendships and family are important, more so sometimes than your standing in life. This is obviously what Aaron believes.

Born a Zabbaleen, Aaron is forced to work with the rest of the men to scavenge rubbish off the busy streets of Cairo. Living with his abusive stepfamily and with the low price of recyclable goods scraping a living is much harder than it once was. Aaron did always have a special way with the glass; only his practiced fingers could gather so much broken glass without cutting h Friendships and family are important, more so sometimes than your standing in life.

Aaron did always have a special way with the glass; only his practiced fingers could gather so much broken glass without cutting himself. Aaron knows more about glass than anyone he knew, the colours, the lights and beauty that is and can be made from glass. Caught with a stolen perfume bottle it seems that the delights of being a glass collector are now denied him. An outcast with nowhere to go Aaron must learn the error of his ways and repent for his sins to be allowed back into the community and to have any chance at being with the girl he loves.

I think that Anna Perera has captured the thoughts and feelings of the characters brilliantly. The class Collector is written in both present tense and first person. This does well to display the thoughts and feelings of life in a poor village. This sensational novel confronts several difficult topics and life ideas including desperation, faith, social standards and wealth. This is tough! Because of its obvious social importance, particularly from a teaching point of view, I want to give The Glass Collector four points.

But I find that I cannot. Being a teacher myself, I can see what Perera is trying to do. This seems to be a novel intended for instruction, and that’s fine, but it often feels too instructional.

Perera continually qualifies what is happening in the scenes, especially those concerning Aaron; she does too much telling at the expense of showing. If she This is tough! To collect broken glass. His life? His hope? To find a future he can believe in. Today in Cairo, Egypt, there is a city within a city: a city filled with garbage–literally. As one of the Zabbaleen people, Aaron makes his living sorting through waste. When his family kicks him out, his only alternatives are to steal, beg, or take the most nightmarish garbage-collecting job of all.

The Glass Collector by Anna Perera. June 12, Reviewer: Kristen. Nevertheless, this novel will definitely interest teenage readers who are eager to know more about the wider world, particularly if their curiosity about Egypt has been piqued by recent events.

The Glass Collector by Anna Perera — review. Josh Lacey enjoys the vivid evocation of an Egyptian teenager’s life. Topics Children and teenagers reviews. Reuse this content. Fifteen-year-old Aaron lives amongst the rubbish piles in the slums of Cairo. His job? To collect broken glass. His life? His hope? To find a future he can believe in. Today in Cairo, Egypt, there is a city within a city: a city filled with garbage–literally. As one of the Zabbaleen people, Aaron makes his living sorting through waste.

When his family kicks him out, his only alternatives are to steal, beg, or take the most nightmarish garbage-collecting job of all. Previous page. Print length. Albert Whitman Teen. Publication date. Grade level. Reading age. Lexile measure. See all details. Next page. Review “Perera takes teen readers into a new world in this often-eloquent novel A novel of hope and redemption in the most unlikely of settings.

Perera draws a vivid portrait of the community’s squalid living conditions A powerful rendering of human struggle, resilience, and hope. She worked as an English teacher in two secondary schools in London, and later became responsible for a unit for boys excluded from mainstream schools.

She lives in Hampshire, England. Her first young adult novel was Guantanamo Boy. Read more. Tell the Publisher! I’d like to read this book on Kindle Don’t have a Kindle?

Shop for global treasures with live virtual tours. Amazon Explore Browse now. Customer reviews. How customer reviews and ratings work Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them.

 
 

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